Bibliography Chairul Tanjung

Indonesian literature, is a term grouping various genres of South-East Asian literature.

Indonesian Literature can refer to literature produced in the Indonesian archipelago. It is also used to refer more broadly to literature produced in areas with common language roots based on the Malay language (of which Indonesian is one scion). This would extend the reach to the Maritime Southeast Asia, including Indonesia, but also other nations with a common language such as Malaysia and Brunei, as well as population within other nations such as the Malay people living in Singapore.

The phrase Indonesian literature is used in this article to refer to Indonesian as written in the nation of Indonesia, but also covers literature written in an earlier form of the language, i.e. the Malay language written in the Dutch East Indies. Oral literature, though a central part of the Indonesian literary tradition, is not described here.

Blurred distinctions[edit]

The languages spoken (and part of them written) in the Indonesian Archipelago number over a thousand, and for that reason alone it is impracticable to survey their entire literary production in one article. Since the thought of a national Indonesian language only struck root as recently as the 1920s, this means that emphasis in the present article is put on the twentieth century.

At the same time, such a choice leaves a number of distinctions open. Major factors which make for a blurring of distinctions are:

  • the difficulty of distinguishing between Malay and Indonesian
Even in the 1930s, Malay was the lingua franca of the Archipelago, but was also used widely outside it, while a national Indonesian language was still in a state of development.[1] Thus, it is often difficult to ascertain where Malay leaves off and Indonesian begins. Nor is it possible to understand the development of Indonesian literature without study of the older Malay which it reacted against, and whose tradition it continued.
  • mutual influence between regional languages and their literatures.
A work which appears in one Indonesian language may be found in a variant form in one or more others, especially when such literature has been part of the tradition for a long time.
  • the problem of distinguishing between oral and written literature
Oral literature is, of course, assessed by other means than written manifestations, and field-work is one of these means. However, in the written literature, too, poetry may have been recorded which had originated as oral literature.[2]

Overview[edit]

During its early history, Indonesia was the centre of trade among sailors and traders from China, India, Europe and the Middle East. Indonesia was then a colony of the Netherlands (ca. 1600—1942) and Japan (1942–45). Its literary tradition was influenced by these cultures, mainly those of India, Persia, China and, more recently, Western Europe. However, unique Indonesian characteristics cause it to be considered as a separate path and tradition.

Chronologically Indonesian literature may be divided into several periods:

  • Pujangga Lama: the "Literates of Olden Times" (traditional literature)
  • Sastra Melayu Lama: "Older Malay Literature"
  • Angkatan Balai Pustaka: the "Generation of the [Colonial] Office for Popular Literature" (from 1908)
  • Angkatan Pujangga Baru: the "New Literates" (from 1933)
  • Angkatan 1945: the "Generation of 1945"
  • Angkatan 1950 - 1960-an: the "Generation of the 1950s"
  • Angkatan 1966 - 1970-an: the "Generation of 1966 into the 1970s"
  • Angkatan 1980-an: the "Decade of the 1980s"
  • Angkatan Reformasi: the post-Suharto "Reformation Period"
  • Angkatan 2000-an: the "Generation of 2000s"

There is considerable overlapping between these periods, and the usual designation according to "generations" (angkatan) should not allow us to lose sight of the fact that these are movements rather than chronological periods. For instance, older Malay literature was being written until well into the twentieth century. Likewise, the Pujangga Baru Generation was active even after the Generation of 1950 had entered the literary scene.

Traditional literature: Pujangga Lama[edit]

Early Indonesian literature originates in Malay literature, and the influence of these roots was felt until well into the twentieth century. The literature produced by the Pujangga lama (literally "the old poets") was mainly written before the 20th century, but after the coming of Islam. Before that time, however, there must have existed a lively oral tradition.[3] Within traditional Malay-language literature, sometimes it is differentiated into 3 periods: before ~1550 AD; between ~1550-1750 AD; ~1750-1900 AD.[4]

Genres[edit]

In written poetry and prose, a number of traditional forms dominate, mainly:—

Works[edit]

Some of these works are:

syair 
Syair Bidasari, Syair Ken Tambuhan, Syair Raja Mambang Jauhari, Syair Raja Siak
pantun 
scattered items found all over the Indonesian Archipelago, and also incorporated in other works (e.g., Sejarah Melayu) [5]
hikayat 
Hikayat Abdullah (1849), Hikayat Andaken Penurat, Hikayat Bayan Budiman, Hikayat Djahidin, Hikayat Hang Tuah, Hikayat Kadirun, Hikayat Kalila dan Damina, Hikayat Masydulhak, Hikayat Pelanduk Jinaka, Hikayat Pandja Tanderan, Hikayat Putri Djohar Manikam, Hikayat Tjendera Hasan, Tsahibul Hikayat.
historiography 
Sejarah Melayu.

1870—1942: Sastra Melayu Lama[edit]

The literature of this period was produced from the year 1870 until 1942. The works from this period were predominantly popular among the people in Sumatra (i.e. the regions of Langkat, Tapanuli, Padang, etc.), the Chinese and the Indo-Europeans. The first works were dominated by syair, hikayat and translations of western novels. These are:

Angkatan Balai Pustaka[edit]

Unifying forces[edit]

Until the twentieth century, ethnic and linguistic diversity was dominant in the vast archipelago, and as a result, no national literature existed. Literature in Malay rubbed shoulders with works in other languages of the region, from Batak in the West through Sundanese, Javanese, Balinese, to Moluccan in the East. It is true that Malay was used as the lingua franca of the colony, and indeed, far beyond its borders, but it could not be regarded as a national language.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, however, changes became visible. National consciousness emerged among educated Indonesians especially. At the same time, the Dutch colonisers temporarily veered to a point of view which allowed for the education and unification of the Indonesian peoples to self-reliance and maturity, as it was perceived. Indonesian independence, however, was not contemplated by the Dutch. A third factor was the emergence of newspapers, which at the beginning of the century began to appear in Chinese and subsequently in Malay.[6]

The Bureau for Popular Literature[edit]

Education, means of communication, national awareness: all these factors favoured the emergence of a comprehensive Indonesian literature. The Dutch, however, wished to channel all these forces, nipping any political subversiveness in the bud while at the same time instructing and educating Indonesians, in a way the government saw fit. For those reasons, an official Bureau (or: Commission) for Popular Literature was instituted under the name Balai Pustaka, which became some sort of government-supervised publisher. Besides preventing criticism of the colonial government, Balai Pustaka blocked all work that might be conducive to any sort of religious controversy, and anything "pornographic" was avoided: even a novel featuring divorce had to be published elsewhere.

At the same time, school libraries were founded and were supplied by the new publisher. Works in Dutch as well as translations of world literature were brought out, but a burgeoning indigenous literature was also stimulated.[7] From 1920 to 1950 Balai Pustaka published many works in high Malay (as opposed to everyday "street Malay"), but also in Javanese and Sundanese, and occasionally also in Balinese, Batak or Madurese.

The first Indonesian novel[edit]

During this period, whose heyday was in the 1920s, Indonesian literature came to be dominated by fiction (both short stories and novels), and Western-style drama and poetry, which gradually replaced the earlier syair, gurindam, pantun and hikayat. Merari Siregar's Azab dan Sengsara was the very first modern novel appearing in Indonesian, constituting a break with the Malay romance tradition. While not completely successful, in that it rather schematically deals in black-and-white oppositions, and directly addresses the reader, subverting its realism, this may still be regarded as the first treatment of contemporaneous problems (i.e., the issue of forced marriage) in the realist tradition.[8]

Authors and works of the Balai Pustaka Generation[edit]

Interlude: the '20s Generation[edit]

Meanwhile, not all publications in the languages of Indonesia appeared under the Balai Pustaka imprint. As mentioned, this publisher was a government-supervised concern, and it operated in the context of political and linguistic developments. Notable among these developments were an increasing consciousness of nationality, and the emergence of Indonesian as the embodiment of a national language.

Nur Sutan Iskandar was the most active authors and he could be called as "the King of Balai Pustaka Generation". When viewed the original author, could said that the novels of a raised in the generation are "novel Sumatera", with the Minangkabau as the centre point.[9]

Politics[edit]

In 1908, Budi Utomo, the first indigenous movement, was founded. Conceived as a political organisation, it soon adapted its objectives under pressure from the Dutch government, and mainly restricted itself to cultural activities.[10] Political concerns were more prominent in Sarekat Islam, founded in 1912 as a society of tradesmen, but which soon evolved into a nationalist movement, counting among its members the future President of the Republic, Soekarno, and the communist Semaun. Meanwhile, other societies were founded, and a political party mainly aimed at halfcaste Dutch and Indonesian members appeared.

In due course, the Dutch colonizers followed suit, and a Volksraad (Dutch East Indies) ("People's Council") was founded in 1918.[11] This Council was an assembly of Dutch and Indonesian members, whose powers, however, were severely restricted. It was a consultative committee advising the Governor General, the Dutch viceroy of the East-Indies, who could react to the Council's advice as he pleased.

Language[edit]

One of the first actions the Volksraad took was to request the sanction of the use of two official languages in its meetings: Dutch and Malay. Although until well into the 1930s only one Council member consistently used Malay,[12] it was significant that the language had now acquired official status.

In 1928, an association of young Javanese intellectuals referred to the language as "Bahasa Indonesia" ("Indonesian language"), for the first time, thus emphasising the notion of a national rather than an ethnic language. A few months later, on 28 October 1928, a congress of associations of young Indonesians, known as the Youth Congress (Sumpah Pemuda) adopted the principles of "one people, one nation, one language".,[13] and this step may be regarded as the birth of the Indonesian language.

Literature[edit]

It was, however, still a language in development. Indonesian had never been a national language, and to most Indonesians it, or its ancestral Malay, had never been their mother tongue. For all this, in addition to the publications of Balai Pustaka and its magazine Panji Pustaka,[14] other magazines featured work by Indonesian writers as well, although there was not as yet one particular indigenous magazine devoted exclusively to the emerging literature. However, a notable source was Jong Sumatra, a magazine founded in 1918 as the platform of Jong Sumatranen Bond, the Association of Young Sumatran intellectuals.

Pujangga Baru[edit]

Forces towards renewal[edit]

As a result of all this, dominant factors in the literary landscape of the 1930s were the following:

  • National consciousness among young Indonesian intellectuals was well-developed.
  • These intellectuals had formed various groups: there existed, then, a certain degree of organisation.
  • The need for a national language was felt, as was the need for literary expression in that language.
  • While a platform for such expression existed in Balai Pustaka, this platform was considered unsatisfactory in that it was government-controlled, and therefore at odds with the urge for nationalist development. The intervention of Dutch language officials was felt to be censorship, and the editorial policy was regarded as an unwarranted harnessing of the emerging language. (Thus, certain words were invariably replaced by more "respectable" synonyms, which seemed to curtail language development as well as freedom of expression.[15])
  • At the same time, young intellectuals felt that their classic Malay literature had congealed into set turns of phrase, clichéd descriptions and conventional plots.[16] While literature cannot but operate between the polarities of convention and renewal, classic conventions were now felt to be over-constrictive, and their Western-style schooling had made them conscious of the possibilities for renewal.

A new magazine[edit]

Angkatan Pujangga Baru was created as a reaction to all this. This "Generation of the New Literates (or New Poets)" adopted its very name, Poedjangga Baroe, to emphasise its striving for renewal, attempting to break away both from the set forms of traditional Malay literature and from the yoke of colonial constraints: the objective was a new poetics and a new national consciousness.

To this end, in 1933 they founded the first national literary magazine, Poedjangga Baroe,[17] created by Sutan Takdir Alisjahbana, Amir Hamzah (regarded as the greatest of the poets of the late colonial period),[18] and Armijn Pane. Its main protagonists were the three founders, together with Sanusi Pane (brother of Armijn).

The magazine was published between 1933 and 1942. When the Japanese occupied the country, a request on the part of the editors for permission to continue publication went unanswered, and this was tantamount to a refusal.[19] Publication was resumed in 1948, until the magazine finally folded in 1953. Although influential as the pioneering platform of an emerging Indonesian literature, sales had never been comfortable: Sutan Takdir Alisjahbana has revealed that the periodical's subscription was never much more than 150.[citation needed][20]

Characteristics[edit]

Poedjangga Baroe occasionally, and for reasons that have not been explained, included prose in English, and more regularly and perhaps understandably, prose and poetry in Dutch.[21] However, the magazine was characterised by its position as the first literary periodical in the national language. In contrast with Panji Pustaka (the Balai Pustaka magazine), its editors were all Indonesians, who had as often as not received their editorial training by working for the government publishers in the 1920s. There was one exception: Beb Vuyk, an Indo-European (Eurasian) author of Dutch nationality but with strong nationalist sympathies, was briefly on the editorial board before the war broke out.[22]

The contents of the magazine were dominated by essays, often touching on the requirements and exigencies of the new literature; and by poetry in the modern vein. This modernism was a conscious breakaway from tradition, although two quite distinct tendencies were discernible.

Romanticism[edit]

On the one hand, poets (who usually had had a Dutch schooling) connected with a late Romantic movement in Dutch poetry, the Beweging van Tachtig.[23] (Sutan Takdir Alisjahbana was the main proponent of this tendency.)

  • This "Movement of the 1880s" had put emphasis on the individual expression of emotions, and it is this emphasis which was reflected in the new Indonesian poetry. The central role of individual emotions is borne out by the titles of some poems; representative instances are: Mengeluh ("Complaint"), Kematian Anak ("The Death of a Child"), or Di Kakimu ("At Your Feet").[24]
  • Nature poetry, in addition, bore witness to the romantic nature of this movement, with titles such as Sawah ("Rice Fields") or Bintang ("Stars").[24]
  • A third aspect involved mysticism, Sanusi Pane's poem Do'a ("Prayer") perhaps the best-known instance, with its opening stanza:[25]

Original

Bikin gua, Masinis mulia,
Jadi sekerup dalam masinmu,
Yang menjalankan kapal dunia,
Ke pelabuhan sama ratamu.

Translation

Make me, Great Engineer,
A cog in Your machine
Which takes the ship of the world
To the harbour of Your rest.

  • The influence of Romanticism was discernible, too, in the use of westernising verse forms, notably the sonnet. This constituted a break with traditional syair and pantun. At the same time, practitioners of the new sonnet form maintained that it had its similarities with the pantun. A traditional sonnet had its volta, a thematic turn between the eighth and ninth verses, and likewise, a strong contrast is seen between the first and second couplets of a pantun.[26]

The Dutch example was not followed slavishly. In particular, its emphasis on the strictly individual in human experience was rejected. It was the poets' task, Poedjangga Baroe maintained, to be a social agent, a force for national development. To some of its members, too, the role of the poet was a religious one.[27]

The easterns tradition[edit]

On the other hand, some members of the movement were not unequivocally in favour of western influence. A countervailing tendency was found in traditional eastern literature. The influence of Rabindranath Tagore was felt. Amir Hamzah was greatly attracted to the Thousand and One Nights, although his intention to translate this work into Indonesian never materialised. The Bhagavad Gitawas translated into Indonesian by him.[28] Sanusi Pane's play Manusia Baru ("New Humanity") was set in India.[29] Plays were based on Java's past. Amir Hamzah anthologised eastern poetry.[30]

Other works[edit]

Some works of the Pujangga Baru generation are worthy of especial mention. Sutan Takdir Alisjahbana's short novel Layar Terkembang ("The Sail Unfolds") is a sensitive portrayal of young women in contemporary Indonesia. Rustam Effendi with his Bebasari wrote the first modern play (on a historical theme). Armijn Pane's Belenggu ("Shackles") dealt with extramarital relations, thus initially giving rise to controversy, but eventually the novel became a classic and has been described as the first psychological novel in Indonesian.[31]

Authors and works of the Pujangga Baru Generation[edit]

Angkatan 1945[edit]

The works of authors during this period are dominated by the thoughts of independence and political manner. The works created by angkatan '45 are mostly more realistic, compared to the works of pujangga baru, which are more romantic - idealistic.

Authors and works of Angkatan '45[edit]

Angkatan 1950[edit]

See also: Indonesian literature in the period 1950–65

Angkatan 1950 was characterised by the Kisah magazine, established by H.B. Jassin (1917-2000). This generation of Indonesian literature was dominated by collections of short stories and poetry.

Authors and works of the Angkatan 50[edit]

Angkatan 1966[edit]

Angkatan '66 was marked by rising the Horison magazine, led by Mochtar Lubis[32] Dozens of writers previously associated with Lekra or leftist groups went into exile overseas, creating their own literature.[33]

Authors and works of the Angkatan '66[edit]

Home » Businessman , Entrepreneur » Chairul Tanjung Biography - Businessman From Indonesian

Chairul Tanjung Biography - Businessman From Indonesian

Chairul Tanjung
Biographyany | People Inspiration - Chairul born in Jakarta, June 16, 1962, born in Jakarta in the family is enough. His father A.G. Tanjung is old order era journalist who publishes a small circulation newspapers. Chairul are in a family with six other siblings. When arriving in the New Order era, his father's business was forced to close due to politically opposed to the rulers at that time. The situation is forcing parents to sell the house and move to stay in the room inn which sempi

He is is a businessman from Indonesia. His name is widely known as a successful businessman with the company he leads, the Group, Chairul has started doing business when she attended from the Department of Dentistry, University of Indonesia. Had ups and downs, he eventually built a successful business. His conglomerate, the Group becomes a business enterprise in charge of some other companies such as Trans TV and Mega Bank

After finishing school in high school Boedi Oetomo in 1981, entered Chairul Department of Dentistry, University of Indonesia (graduated 1987). When this college he entered the business world began. And in college, he was honored as National Model Student 1984-1985. In order to meet the needs of college, he starts a business from scratch that is selling textbooks stencils, shirts, and others on campus. He also opened a photocopy on campus. Chairul also founded a medical supply store and laboratory numbers Senen Raya, Central Jakarta, but it broke.

After college, Chairul been established PT Pariarti Shindutama with three colleagues in 1987. Capitalized initial USD 150 million from Exim Bank, they produce children's shoes for export. Luck sided with him, because the company immediately received orders of 160 thousand pairs of shoes from Italy. However, due to differences in vision of expansion, Chairul choose separation and establish their own business.

His skills as an entrepreneur to build a network and make business grow. Directing business to a conglomerate, Chairul reposition itself into three core businesses: financial, property, and multimedia. In the financial sector, he took over what is now Bank Karman Bank Mega. He named the company with the Group. The company has a core conglomeration Holdindo as father holding company, which is in charge of several sub-holding, namely the Global Investindo (business finance), The Core Investindo (media and investment) and the Core Propertindo (property).

Under the group, Chairul has a number of companies in the financial sector include General Insurance Mega Life Insurance Mega Life, The Multi Finance, Bank Mega, Mega Capital Indonesia, Bank Syariah Mega and Mega Finance. While in the field of property and investments, the company in charge of the London Propertindo The Propertindo Bali, Batam Indah Investindo, Mega Indah Propertindo. And in the field of broadcasting and multimedia, The Group has a Trans TV, Trans 7, Mahagagaya Prime, Trans Fashion, Lifestyle Trans and Trans Studio. Specialized in property business, the Group has Bandung Supermall. 3 acres Mal spent over 99 billion dollars. The Group launched Bandung Supermall as the Central Business District in 1999. While in the field of investment, In early 2010, the Group through its subsidiary, Trans Corp. bought a majority stake in Carrefour, which is some 40 percent. Regarding the purchase of Carrefour, the MoU (memorandum of understanding) purchase of Carrefour's shares was signed on March 12, 2010 in France.

Renowned Forbes magazine released a list of the world's richest people 2010. As an achievement, according to the magazine, Chairul one of the world's richest man from Indonesia. Forbes stated that Chairul 937 ranks the world with total assets of U.S. $ 1 billion.
Chairul Tanjung
Chairul said that in building a business, develop a network (network) is important. Having a partner (partner) is well needed. Building a relationship was not only to companies that are reputable, but also on an unknown though. For Chairul, a good friend will help evolve business processes undertaken. When business conditions are not good (read: quiet subscribers), the network can rely on. For Chairul, even friends with any official letter carriers is important. In terms of investment, Chairul own idealism that local companies can be a company that can synergize with multinational companies. He does not shut himself to working with multinationals from abroad. For him, this is not an attempt to sell the country. However, this effort is a national company Indonesia can stand alone, and so the host country itself.

According to Chairul, capital is important in building and growing a business. For him, the willingness and hard work should be owned by someone who wants to succeed in business. But getting a reliable partner is everything. For him, as well as build trust by building integrity. This is where the importance of networking (networking) in running the business.

In business, Chairul said that the younger generation businesses should be patient, and willing to venture up the stairs one at a time. According to him, building a business is not like turning the palm of the hand. It takes a patience, and never give up. Do not let the many who take the instantaneous (instant), because in the business world patience is one key to steal the heart of the market. Build integrity is important for Chairul. It is human as he tried, someone wanted to get the result. Not all results can be received directly.

National Education
- SD Van Lith, Jakarta (1975)
- SMP Van Lith, Jakarta (1978)
- SMA Negeri I Budi Utomo, Jakarta (1981)
- Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia (1987)

Other Activities
- Member of the Jakarta Initiative Advisory Committee (Corporate Restructuring)
- Delegation of Indonesia for the Asia-Europe Business Forum
- Members of the Pacific Basin Economic Council
- Jakarta Arts Foundation Board
- Chairman of the Board of the All-Indonesia Badminton Association
- Member of the Board of Trustees, University of Indonesia
- Chairman of the Yayasan Indonesia Forum

He is highly skilled in networking and organizing things is what makes the business grow. Once out of the PT Pariarti Shindutama Chairul reposition itself into three core businesses: financial, property, and multimedia.

Later he founded a group of companies with the name of the Group. The company has a core conglomeration Holdindo as fatherholding company, which is in charge of several sub-holding, namely the Global Investindo (business finance), The Core Investindo (media and investment) and the Core Propertindo (property).
Under the group, Chairul has a number of companies in various fields such as:
Chairul Tanjung
Mega Corpora
Banking

  • PT Bank Mega Tbk (Bank Mega)
  • PT Bank Syariah Mega Indonesia (Bank Mega Syariah)
  • Insurance
  • PT Mega Life Insurance
  • PT General Insurance Mega
  • The capital market
  • PT Mega Capital Indonesia
  • Financing
  • PT The Multifinance
  • PT Mega Auto Finance
  • PT Mega Central Finance
  • Trans Corp
  • Trans Media Corpora
  • PT Television Transformation Indonesia (Trans TV)
  • PT Duta Visual Nusantara Tivi Seven (Trans7)
  • PT Agranet Multicitra Siberkom (AFP)
  • PT Trans Lifestyle
  • PT Anta Express Tour & Travel Service Limited
  • PT Trans Fashion
  • PT Trans Mahagaya
  • PT Mahagaya Prime (Prada, Miu Miu, Tod's, Aigner, Brioni, Celio, Hugo Boss, Francesco Biasia, Jimmy Choo, Canali, Mango)
  • PT Trans F & B
  • PT Trans Coffee (The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf)
  • PT Trans Ice
  • PT Naryadelta Prarthana (Baskin Robbins)
  • PT Metropolitan Retailmart (Metro department store)
  • PT Trans Airways
  • PT Trans Media Partners
  • PT Trans Entertainment
  • PT Trans Property
  • PT Propertindo The Bandung (Bandung Supermal)
  • PT Batam Indah Investindo
  • PT Karya Mandiri Data
  • PT Mega Indah Propertindo
  • PT The Bali Propertindo
  • PT Trans Studio
  • PT Trans Kalla Makassar (Makassar Trans Studio Resort)
  • Trans Studio Resort Bandung
  • PT Trans Retail
  • PT Carrefour Indonesia
  • PT CT Global Resources
  • PT The Core Energy
  • PT The Energy Investindo
  • CT PT Agro
  • PT Kaltim CT Agro
  • PT Kalimantan CT Agro
  • PT Kalimantan CT Agro
  • PT Direction Tumata
  • PT Wahana Kutai Kencana

Achievement of the Group are: in the real estate business, the Group has Bandung Supermall. 3 acres Mal spent over 99 billion dollars. The Group launched Bandung Supermall as the Central Business District in 1999. While in the field of investment, In early 2010, the Group through its subsidiary, Trans Corp., Bought a majority stake in Carrefour, which is some 40 percent. Regarding the purchase of Carrefour, the MoU (memorandum of understanding) signed the share purchase tanggal12 Carrefour in France in March 2010.

Leading economic magazine Forbes released a list of the world's richest people in 2010 edition. according to the magazine, Chairul one of the world's richest man from Indonesia. Forbes stated that Chairul ranks 937th richest person in the world with total assets of U.S. $ 1 billion. In 2011, Forbes ranked Chairul 11 ​​richest people in Indonesia, with total assets of U.S. $ 2.1 billion, and according to the latest data that I get from forbes in 2012 Chairul was 8th richest man in Indonesia and ranks 634 in the world with a fortune of 2 billion U.S. $ or equivalent to 19.3 trillion rupiah
On December 1, 2011, Chairul formalizing changes to the Group Corp CT. CT Corp consists of three sub-holding companies: Mega Corp, Trans Corp, and CT Global Resources that include financial services, media, retail, lifestyle, entertainment, and natural resources

Thought

Chairul said that in building a business, develop a network (network) is important. Having a partner (partner) is well needed. Building a relationship was not only to companies that are reputable, but also on an unknown though. For Chairul, a good friend will help evolve business processes undertaken. When business conditions are not good (read: quiet subscribers), the network can rely on. For Chairul, even friends with any official letter carriers is important.
In terms of investment, Chairul own idealism that local companies can be a company that can synergize with multinational companies. He does not shut himself to working with multinationals from abroad. For him, this is not an attempt to sell the country. However, this effort is a national company Indonesia can stand alone, and so the host country itself.
According to Chairul, capital is important in building and growing a business. For him, the willingness and hard work should be owned by someone who wants to succeed in business. But getting a reliable partner is everything. For him, as well as build trust by building integrity. This is where the importance of networking (networking) in running the business.
In business, Chairul said that the younger generation businesses should be patient, and willing to venture up the stairs one at a time. According to him, building a business is not like turning the palm of the hand. It takes a patience, and never give up. Do not let the many who take the instantaneous (instant), because in the business world patience is one key to steal the heart of the market. Build integrity is important for Chairul. It is human as he tried, someone wanted to get the result. Not all results can be received directly.

Book

Chairul life story was written in a book called "the son of cassava" megisahkan book about the life journey of Chairul small to be successful as it is today, Thick book 360 pages published Publisher Compass (PBK) is compiled by Reuters reporters Tjahja Gunawan Adiredja. The book is given a foreword by Jakob Oetama, Founder and Superior General Kompas,
Chairul biography begins with the story of how in the midst of the limitations of the economic conditions, he was able to continue their education into college. Both parents are very strict in educating their children, parents have the principle, "To get out of poverty, education is a step that must be taken with all the resources and efforts." Whatever will they try so that their children can pursue higher education as The main provision of future life.
This book can be found at bookstores seaside at Rp 58,000, -
book by the author of the book entitled cassava because the child while still a child Chairul teased his friends as the children which means cassava plebeian children, but now the reality of the child cassava has transformed into an extraordinary entrepreneur, so what's in a name

reference :
http://amin-x.blogspot.com/2012/07/biografi-chairul-tanjung-si-anak.html
http://masukajabro.blogspot.com/2012/12/biografi-chairul-tanjung.html

0 Replies to “Bibliography Chairul Tanjung”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *